St Andrews HCI Research Group

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Seminar: Rights-driven Development


Abstract:

Alex will discuss a critique of modern software engineering and outline how it systematically produces systems that have negative social consequences. To help counter this trend, he offers the notion of rights-driven development, which puts the concept of a right at the heart of software engineering practices. Alex’s first step to develop rights-driven practices is to introduce a language for rights in software engineering. He provides an overview of the elements such a language must contain and outlines some ideas for developing a domain-specific language that can be integrated with modern software engineering approaches. 

Bio:

Alex Voss, who’s an Honorary Lecturer here at the school and an external member of our group. Alex was also a Technology Fellow at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and an Associate in the Department of Philosophy at Harvard.

Alex holds a PhD in Informatics and works at the intersection of the social sciences and computer science. His current research aims to develop new representations, practices and tools for rights-respecting software engineering. He is also working on the role that theories of causation have in making sense of complex socio-technical systems.

His research interests include: causality in computing, specifically in big data and machine learning applications; human-centric co-realization of technologies; responsible innovation; computing and society; computer-based and computer-aided research methods.

More about Alex: https://research-portal.st-andrews.ac.uk/en/persons/alexander-voss

Event details:

  • When: 28th February 2024 12:30 – 13:30
  • Where: Jack Cole 1.19

 

If you’re interested in attending any of the seminars in room 1.19, please email the SACHI seminar coordinator: aaa8@st-andrews.ac.uk so they can make appropriate arrangements for the seminar based on the number of attendees.

TEI ’24 Entangled Threads Workshop


Sign up for our workshop Exploring the value and significance of bringing a craft ethos to debates around the IoT/connected things

Call for Participation

Join us for a one day workshop to explore how a craft practice and ethos can help us to respond to privacy, trust, bias and the Internet of Things.

“How healthy is the internet?”  As more and more things become internet-connected (i.e. become part of the IoT) questions of trust, privacy, security, data ownership, data bias, and the commercial abuse of data, become ever more pressing. This reflects a recognition of a wider problem with the internet alongside the rapid developments in machine learning (i.e. AI) and how it is being unreflectively ‘put to work’ in an ever-increasing range of applications. This workshop will explore these tensions and concerns through the lens of craft, both as a practice and a conceptual ethos.

Embroidery pieces along with some 3d printed silhouette of people

This studio will use embroidery as a craft-oriented communal/social practice activity to scaffold a discussion framed by our craft ethos characteristics, involving notions of; subjectivity, bespokeness, localism, embodiment, provenance, authenticity, and care-full-ness. Embroidery is an appropriate craft-oriented method which we believe encourages flavors of conversation that are distinct from other forms of participatory workshops. Whilst these activities will likely enable mindful stitching, we are more pointedly using this method as a dialogical activity where the acts of communal stitching will enable us to direct conversation to certain aspects of craft characteristics beyond the literal objects participants are making. Through this embodied making activity, you will create a bespoke embroidered badge based on a set of provocations and take a deep dive into the issues with IoT we have highlighted.

Through making together in small groups, supported by experienced researchers working in the field, we hope to provide an environment for rich discussion and material speculation on alternative visions of ‘healthier’ connected futures. The studio will use the embroidered outcomes as well as a range of predesigned props and design resources to not only discuss entanglements of living well in a digital culture, but also to help us collectively and individually envision stories/scenarios which encapsulates vision/s of an alternative, healthier, digitally connected future. At the conclusion of the workshop we will explore the possibility of setting up a special interest group that takes our thinking forward into the future.

More information and Sign up here

Congratulations to Adam Binks, Alice Toniolo and Miguel Nacenta on publishing their paper ‘Representational transformations: Using maps to write essays’


The paper is open access: Representational transformations: Using maps to write essays.

Summary of the paper and its findings

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We built a tool to study how writers move between map and text to write essays. The main takeaway is that important cognitive work happens in the transformation process between map and text representations.

There are lots of existing tools for building representations to support complex cognitive tasks – e.g. argument maps, text, notes, slides, sketches, and so on. But tool support for the transformations *between* representations is much more neglected – and we think it’s crucial!

We built Write Reason, a tool which combines a text editor and a mapping interface. You can drag parts of the map into the text, and parts of the text into the map, and it helps you keep them in sync.


We then studied how 20 students used Write Reason to write essays. You can interactively explore the maps and essays built by participants. We identified key properties of transformations: change in representation type, cardinality, and explicitness. And we found that most used an all-at-once batch translation, while a few used bit-by-bit interleaving. 

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We think understanding transformations is crucial for building the next generation of multi-representational tools. How can we better support multi-transformation pipelines like these? Can automation unlock more complex + powerful workflows, which would be tedious to do manually?

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Our findings revealed and falsified some of the key implicit assumptions that we baked into the design of Write Reason. We hope that these reflections will help other designers and researchers start one step ahead of us and avoid these mistakes!

Project page. Paper (open access).

Congratulations Dr. Carneiro & Dr. Carson


Thrilled to see Iain and Guilherme graduating this week. Congratulations on your well-deserved success Dr. Carneiro & Dr. Carson!

SACHI @ MobileHCI 2019, UIST 2019 and ISS 2019


Hui-Shyong Yeo from SACHI was attending MobileHCI 2019 in Taiwan, UIST 2019 in New Orleans, USA and ISS 2019 in Daejeon, South Korea.

He presented 2 papers and a demo at the conferences. He was a student volunteer at ISS.

 

WRIST: Watch-Ring Interaction and Sensing Technique for Wrist Gestures And Macro-Micro Pointing
Hui-Shyong Yeo, Juyoung Lee, Hyung-il Kim, Aakar Gupta, Andrea Bianchi, Daniel Vogel, Woontack Woo, Aaron Quigley
In Proceedings of International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, MobileHCI’19.

[PDF][ACM DL]

[VIDEO]

 

Opisthenar: Hand Poses and Finger Tapping Recognition by Observing Back of Hand Using Embedded Wrist Camera
Hui-Shyong Yeo, Erwin Wu, Juyoung Lee, Aaron Quigley and Hideki Koike
In Proceedings of the ACM symposium on User interface software and technology, UIST’19.

[PDF][ACM DL]

[VIDEO]

 

Presenting Opisthenar

 

Student volunteering at ISS 2019

 

Bill Buxton giving keynote at ISS 2019

 

Erwin Wu demoing Opisthenar at UIST 2019

 

Different WRIST pointing techniques

SACHI @ #CHI2018 in Montreal


CHI 2018
 
 
Members of SACHI will be at the upcoming CHI 2018 conference. If you are looking to meet members of SACHI to discuss collaborations or research visits you can find us here. Likewise, if you are a company attending CHI and you wish to discuss working with us please get in touch. You can find us helping and involved throughout CHI 2018 including 6 full papers (1 best paper), 1 demonstration, 1 late-breaking work and other activities.
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