St Andrews HCI Research Group

Welcome to the website for SACHI which aims to act a focal point for human computer interaction research across the University of St Andrews and beyond.

SACHI is the St Andrews Computer Human Interaction research group (a HCI Group) based in the School of Computer Science. Members of SACHI co-supervise research students, collaborate on various projects and activities, share access to research equipment and our HCI laboratory. Established in 2011, we now have a regular seminar series, social activities, summer schools and organise workshops and conferences together. Along with the above links, you can find more news about us here and our new YouTube video channel here.

News & Events

Professor John Lee: Recycled Resources and Learning Communities


Event details

When: 22nd August 2016 14:00 - 15:00
Where: Cole 1.33a
Speaker: John Lee

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    Title:  Recycled Resources and Learning Communities 

    Abstract:  The concept of learning communities can be seen as central in higher education, especially. Learning is fostered by dialogue, which is implicated in processes of conceptual development and alignment. These rich and complex phenomena include learning through witnessing the learning experiences of others — “vicarious learning” (VL). We propose that VL can be exploited by using rich media (such as video) to capture and share learning experiences. But the potential of rich media is broad and seems to be curiously under-exploited in education. One can envisage learning communities that create and build around learning resources of diverse kinds, using new materials but also integrating many strands of existing materials. In a number of encouraging ways, the available technologies already support this, but are often not greatly used, which suggests a challenge for design. How can we make these technologies more usable for our learning communities? A couple of exploratory approaches are discussed, including an informal experiment upon which it is hoped to build further.

    Biography:  John Lee is Professor of Digital Media at the University of Edinburgh. He holds a PhD in Philosophy and Cognitive Science, from Edinburgh.  He works jointly in the School of Informatics and the Edinburgh College of Art, where he directs the long-standing MSc programme in Design and Digital Media. His research interests centre around cognition and communication in design and learning. For some time, he has been investigating the paradigm of “vicarious learning” and the question of how rich media resources can be used more effectively in applications of learning technologies.

     


    Daniel Holden – Deep Learning for Character Animation


    Event details

    When: 9th August 2016 14:00 - 15:00
    Where: Cole 1.33a
    Speaker: Daniel Holden

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      Abstract: In this talk I will discuss how deep learning can be applied to character animation. I will present a framework based on deep convolutional neural networks that allows for motion synthesis and motion editing in the same unified framework. Applications of this framework include fixing corrupted motion data such as that from the kinect, synthesis of character motion from high level parameters such as the trajectory, motion editing via arbitrary cost functions, and style transfer between two animation clips.

      Biography: Daniel Holden is a PhD student at Edinburgh University studying how deep learning and data driven artistic tools can be used to save time in the production of high quality character animation. Outside of research he maintains several open source C projects and has a wide variety of interests including theory of computation, game development, and writing short fiction.


      Deep View in the News


      We are happy to report that there has been a wide dissemination of the results of the Deepview Project through a variety of press outlets.

      BBC click features excerpts from an interview with one of our researchers about Gazer.

      Furthermore a number of press articles have been written and circulated. The following shows a selection of articles and the venues that publicised each article.

      • “Soon we’ll be able to watch 3D images without the big specs, thanks to St Andrews researchers”. thenational.scot
      • “Diseñan una pantalla que reacciona a la mirada del espectador”. referion.com