St Andrews HCI Research Group

Welcome to the website for SACHI which aims to act a focal point for human computer interaction research across the University of St Andrews and beyond.

SACHI is the St Andrews Computer Human Interaction research group (a HCI Group) based in the School of Computer Science. Members of SACHI co-supervise research students, collaborate on various projects and activities, share access to research equipment and our HCI laboratory. Established in 2011, we now have a regular seminar series, social activities, summer schools and organise workshops and conferences together. Along with the above links, you can find more news about us here and our new YouTube video channel here.

News & Events

SACHI @ CHI 2016


CHI4GoodSACHI will have a great presence at the upcoming CHI’16 conference .

We welcome the opportunity to meet students interested in studying with us, colleagues interested in visiting or collaborating, or companies interested in our work. You can find us helping and involved throughout CHI 2016 with the presentation of 5 full papers, 1 note, 1 workshop, 1 workshop paper and other activities.
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SACHI @ IUI 2016


In March of 2016 Yuchen Zhao and Aaron Quigley from St Andrews attended the ACM SIGCHI Intelligent User Interfaces Conference in California. Yuchen was attending to present a long paper on a user study about location-privacy recommenders and a student consortium paper while Aaron was attending as the ACM SIGCHI Adjunct Chair for Specialised Conferences.

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Elise van den Hoven: Materialising Memories: a design research programme to study everyday remembering


Event details

When: 20th April 2016 14:00 - 15:00
Where: Cole 1.33a

Abstract


Perhaps the term computer ‘memory’ has led people to believe that human memory has to be perfect and infallible. Many people worry when they realise they forget and some turn to recording and collecting as much as they can, e.g. photos or videos through life logging. Some people assume that by collecting they can avoid forgetting or at least have access to the information anytime later. And that is where they might be wrong. First of all, recordings are not equivalent to memories, and memories ‘can not be stored’. Secondly it has already been shown that people collect too much and organize too little for them to be able to find information later [1]. Thirdly, human memory works best when we forget… a lot.
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